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Morrow returns, talks about life after college

October 21, 2011

Joe Florio/ The Courier - Alumni Ben Morrow assesses how confident Prof. McGaan’s communication class is to enter the “real world”.

On Friday, Oct. 14, Ben Morrow, a 2011 graduate, returned to Monmouth College to give advice and relay his experiences in the “real world” after college. After graduating last spring with degrees in communications and public relations, Morrow was recruited as a regional director for the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity.

After weeks of training, Morrow will spend a year traveling to the different SigEp fraternities in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey. While there, Morrow was hired to discuss recruitment.

On Tuesday Oct. 18, however, Morrow gave a different presentation to Professor Lee McGaan’s Organized Communication course.

“When I was a senior, I would have said I felt fairly confident about entering the real world,” said Morrow.

He then asked the class to rate, on a scale of one to ten, how confident they felt about entering the real world. Five students then volunteered to present their biggest question on what they did not know about life after college.

Across the board, all five students said they were not confident about how to find a job they would actually want to apply for.

Some students admitted to being  daunted by these impending decisions, including junior Tessa Ginn, whose question, “When should I start looking for a job?” was met with an immediate reply from Morrow: “Right now.”

Morrow broke down his presentation into three parts – the key, the house, and the bbq – to describe the process of getting a career after college.

“You need the key to get into the house, and in this case, the key is your resume and the house is the interview,” said Morrow. “You need a strong resume to get the interview.”

Morrow emphasized several important items essential to putting on a resume, but the biggest thing he stressed was explaining leadership. Morrow explained leadership is important to have as a quality and as a position within an organization.

Morrow continued to explain the interview process, mentioning the “wining and dining” that comes after the interview. Also known as “the BBQ” in Morrow’s analogy, he explained it as being one of the most crucial parts of the whole process. Simply put, “They’re going to be watching you eat, drink… and they’re going to judge you for it,” said Morrow. Morrow gave a number of tips for this section of the process for getting hired, including hand writing thank you cards.

“Just make sure you don’t have any misspellings!” added professor Trudy Peterson.

Morrow concluded his presentation, leaving his audience with his last remarks.

“After this presentation, I want you to leave with this simple thought: Perception equals reality.”

Morrow explained what people perceive of you, based on your resume, interviews and scrutiny, will be true to them.

Ginn, who was daunted at the beginning of Morrow’s presentation, is now more confident about joining the “real world.”

“Now I know how to make my resume look great, and I get now that what you put out there is what [future potential employers] will perceive,” said Ginn.

Morrow along with his brother Tyler, also a graduate of Monmouth College, spent the rest of the afternoon giving similar talks to other MC students.

“I’m here because I care about [the students], and because I just love this school.”

Megan Zaubi
Features Editor

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