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Extreme penalties for parking violations

March 24, 2017

Fifteen to twenty cars are booted every week in Monmouth College parking lots. Car boots are a new addition to security’s action against cars in violation of parking regulations. Head of security, Andy Davis, says boots are only put on cars that are unregistered. At the start of the academic year 79 percent of cars on campus were unregistered. This percentage refers to cars that were unregistered, and cars that were registered but had not yet picked up their stickers.

Davis said the percentage of unregistered cars has dropped to 27 percent. Davis is confident that the drop in unregistered cars is significantly correlated to security’s use of car boots. According to Davis, car boots are the least intrusive and cheapest option for holding violators accountable for their actions. Boots can be taken off by the security officer on duty, and is cheaper and more convenient than a car being towed.

Andy Davis said, “Safety and security is our main priority for the students, and it’s not fair to the students who pay for parking passes to have spots taken by unregistered vehicles.” Security views booting cars as the fairest option for those that violate regulations. But how do those receiving the car boots feel? Students, visitors, coaches and guests of faculty are among those who have been ‘booted’.

Junior, Kelsey Burkholder, said “I think the car boots are extremely unfair. They say security only boots for certain reasons but I know people who have been booted that are registered and just not parked in the right parking lot, if they are going to boot, at least make it consistent.” After interviewing several students, it was made clear much of the student body has the same opinion as Burkholder.

Senior, Morgan Martindale, shared that she was booted in Early in the fall semester, even though her car was registered. Many other names were given by an array of students claiming to have been booted while being registered. However, these students were unresponsive when contacted for their stories.

Junior, Anonymous, asked “Why don’t they just figure out a different way to make people get registered and get parking stickers more efficiently? I think I speak for most of the students when I say this is unfair no matter how much security tries to make it seem beneficial.”

Haley Thompson
Contributing Writer

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